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Émilie Gerbier

MCF -  UNS

Maître de Conférence en Psychologie (section 16).
Docteur en Sciences Cognitives.

Enseignements en méthodologie expérimentale, statistiques, et psychologie cognitive (Licence et Master de Psychologie).

Domaine de recherche: l’étude des mécanismes cognitifs sous-tendant l’apprentissage et la mémorisation.

Latest publicationsHAL

pour l'idHal "emilie-gerbier" :

titre
The Influence of Sleep on Relearning and Long-term Retention of Verbal Items
auteur
Raphaëlle Rebillart-Sauvaigo, Emilie Gerbier, Fabien Mathy
article
21st conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology, Sep 2019, Tenerife, Spain
annee_publi
2019
resume
We aimed to examine the generalizability of the results obtained by Mazza et al. (2016) on the effect of sleep on relearning and long-term retention. They showed that Swahili-French word pairs were relearned faster after a 12-hour interval when nocturnal sleep was interspersed during this interval, and that they were also better recalled one week later. They used an intensive relearning procedure using tests with feedback until a criterion of all 16 items correct in a row, possibly leading to overlearning. We replicated this original study with a less demanding criterion for relearning, i.e., one correct answer per item. The data are currently being collected. They will indicate whether the sleep effect on relearning and on long-term retention was due to the specific relearning methods, and possibly by overlearning, in Mazza et al.’s study, or whether they can be generalized to different relearning procedures.
typdoc
Poster communications
Accès au texte intégral et bibtex
https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02487151/file/PosterESCOP_Rebillart-Sauvaigo.pdf BibTex
titre
Sleep Does not Help Relearning Declarative Memories in Older Adults
auteur
Emilie Gerbier, Guillaume T. Vallet, Thomas Toppino, Stéphanie Mazza
article
41st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, Jul 2019, Montreal, Canada
annee_publi
2019
resume
How sleep affects memory in older adults is a critical topic, since age significantly impacts both sleep and memory. For declarative memory, previous research reports contradictory results, with some studies showing sleep-dependent memory consolidation and some other not. We hypothesize that this discrepancy may be due to the use of recall as the memory measure, a demanding task for older adults. The present paper focuses on the effect of sleep on relearning, a measure that proved useful to reveal subtle, implicit memory effects. Previous research in young adults showed that sleeping after learning was more beneficial to relearning the same Swahili-French word pairs 12 hours later, compared with the same interval spent awake. In particular, those words that could not be recalled were relearned faster when participants previously slept. The effect of sleep was also beneficial for retention after a one-week and a 6-month delay. The present study used the same experimental design in older adults aged 71 on average but showed no significant effect of sleep on consolidation, on relearning, or on long-term retention. Thus, even when using relearning speed as the memory measure, the consolidating effect of sleep in older adults was not demonstrated, in alignment with some previous findings.
typdoc
Conference papers
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https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02296233/file/Gerbier%20Vallet%20Toppino%20Mazza%202019%20%28sleep%20relearning%20age%20-%20CogSci%29.pdf BibTex
titre
Sleep Enhances Retention and Relearning Speed of Textual Information
auteur
Raphaëlle Rebillart-Sauvaigo, Emilie Gerbier, Fabien Mathy
article
International meeting of the LabEx CORTEX, Jun 2019, Lyon, France
annee_publi
2019
typdoc
Poster communications
Accès au texte intégral et bibtex
https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02487135/file/Poster%20Lyon%20_Rebillart-Sauvaigo.pdf BibTex
titre
Apprendre en dormant : effet du sommeil sur l'apprentissage incident de l'orthographe lexicale
auteur
Raphaëlle Rebillart-Sauvaigo, Emilie Gerbier, Fabien Mathy
article
59ème congrès de la Société Française de Psychologie, Sep 2018, Reims, France
annee_publi
2018
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Conference papers
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titre
Level of initial training moderates the effects of distributing practice over multiple days with expanding, contracting, and uniform schedules: Evidence for study-phase retrieval
auteur
Thomas Toppino, Heather-Anne Phelan, Emilie Gerbier
article
Memory and Cognition, Springer Verlag, 2018, 46 (6), pp.969-978
annee_publi
2018
typdoc
Journal articles
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titre
Apprendre en dormant : Effets du sommeil sur l’apprentissage incident de l’orthographe lexicale
auteur
Raphaëlle Rebillart-Sauvaigo, Emilie Gerbier, Carlos Aguilar, Fabien Mathy
article
Deuxième Rencontre C@UCA, Jun 2018, Fréjus, France
annee_publi
2018
typdoc
Poster communications
Accès au texte intégral et bibtex
https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02487095/file/Poster%20CAUCA_Rebillart-Sauvaigo.pdf BibTex
titre
Audio-visual synchronization in reading while listening to texts: Effects on visual behavior and verbal learning
auteur
Emilie Gerbier, Gérard Bailly, Marie-Line Bosse
article
Computer Speech and Language, Elsevier, 2018, 47 (january), pp.79-92. ⟨10.1016/j.csl.2017.07.003⟩
annee_publi
2018
resume
Reading while listening to texts (RWL) is a promising way to improve the learning benefits provided by a reading experience. In an exploratory study, we investigated the effect of synchronizing the highlighting of words (visual) with their auditory (speech) counterpart during a RWL task. Forty French children from 3rd to 5th grade read short stories in their native language while hearing the story spoken by a narrator. In the non-synchronized (S-) condition the text was written in black on a white background, whereas in the synchronized (S+) RWL, the text was written in grey and the words were dynamically written in black when they were aurally displayed, in a karaoke-like fashion. The children were then unexpectedly tested on their memory for the orthographic form and semantic category of pseudowords that were included in the stories. The effect of synchronizing was null in the orthographic task and negative in the semantic task. Children’s preference was mainly for the S- condition, except for the poorest readers who tended to prefer the S+ condition. In addition, the children's eye movements were recorded during reading. Gaze was affected by synchronization, with fewer but longer fixations on words, and fewer regressive saccades in the S+ condition compared to the S- condition. Thus, the S+ condition presumably captured the children's attention toward the currently heard word, which forced the children to be strictly aligned with the oral modality.
typdoc
Journal articles
Accès au texte intégral et bibtex
https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01575227/file/CSL%20Gerbier%20et%20al.%202017_05_31.pdf BibTex
titre
Apprendre en dormant : effets d’une phase de sommeil entre l’apprentissage et la révision
auteur
Raphaëlle Rebillart-Sauvaigo, Emilie Gerbier
article
58eme congrès annuel de la Société Française de Psychologie, Aug 2017, Nice, France
annee_publi
2017
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Poster communications
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titre
How Sleep Affects Relearning and Long-Term Retention: Age Matters
auteur
Emilie Gerbier, Stéphanie Mazza, Thomas Toppino
article
57th Annual Conference of the Psychonomic Society, Oct 2016, Boston, United States
annee_publi
2016
resume
In young adults, sleeping after learning has been shown to facilitate relearning and long-term retention, compared to staying awake (Mazza et al., in revision). Children (aged 8) and elderly people (aged 71) learned Swahili-French word pairs to criterion during a learning session taking place in the morning or evening (Wake and Sleep group, respectively). Participants spent 12 hours filled with wakefulness or a night of sleep, then performed a relearning session to criterion either in the evening (Wake) or the following morning (Sleep). One week later, retention was tested. Sleep appeared to affect memory differently according to age. The groups of children did not differ during the relearning session whereas the Sleep outperformed the Wake group after one week. In elderly participants, no effect of sleep was observed. Thus, the enhancing effect of sleep is most pronounced in adults, moderate in children, and weak in elderly people.
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Poster communications
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titre
Relearn Faster and Retain Longer: Along With Practice, Sleep Makes Perfect
auteur
Stéphanie Mazza, Emilie Gerbier, Marie-Paule Gustin, Olivier Koenig, Thomas Toppino, Michel Magnin
article
Psychological Science, Association for Psychological Science, 2016, ⟨10.1177/0956797616659930⟩
annee_publi
2016
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