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Anaïs Tran Ngoc

Doctorant -  UCA

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titre
Categorization of Whistled Consonants by French Speakers
auteur
Anaïs Tran Ngoc, Julien Meyer, Fanny Meunier
article
Interspeech 2020 - 21st Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association, Oct 2020, Shanghai (Virtual Conf), China. pp.1600-1604, ⟨10.21437/Interspeech.2020-2683⟩
annee_publi
2020
resume
Whistled speech is a form of modified speech where some frequencies of vowels and consonants are augmented and transposed to whistling, modifying the timbre and the construction of each phoneme. These transformations cause only some elements of the signal to be intelligible for naive listeners, which, according to previous studies, includes vowel recognition. Here, we analyze naive listeners’ capacities for whistled consonant categorization for four consonants: /p/, /k/, /t/ and /s/ by presenting the findings of two behavioral experiments. Though both experiments measure whistled consonant categorization, we used modified frequencies — lowered with a phase vocoder — of the whistled stimuli in the second experiment to better identify the relative nature of pitch cues employed in this process. Results show that participants obtained approximately 50% of correct responses (when chance is at 25%). These findings show specific consonant preferences for “s” and “t” over “k” and “p”, specifically when stimuli is unmodified. Previous research on whistled consonants systems has often opposed “s” and “t” to “k” and “p”, due to their strong pitch modulations. The preference for these two consonants underlines the importance of these cues in phoneme processing.
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titre
Categorization of Whistled Consonants by French Speakers
auteur
Anaïs Tran Ngoc, Julien Meyer, Fanny Meunier
article
Interspeech 2020, Oct 2020, Shanghai, France. pp.1600-1604, ⟨10.21437/Interspeech.2020-2683⟩
annee_publi
2020
resume
Whistled speech is a form ofmodified speechwheresomefrequencies ofvowelsand consonants areaugmentedandtransposed to whistling,modifying thetimbre andtheconstruction of eachphoneme.Thesetransformationscauseonly some elementsofthe signalto beintelligiblefornaivelisteners,which, according to previous studies, includesvowelrecognition.Here, we analyzenaivelisteners’ capacitiesforwhistled consonant categorization for four consonants: /p/, /k/,/t/ and /s/bypresentingthefindings oftwobehavioralexperiments. Though both experiments measurewhistledconsonant categorization,we used modifiedfrequencies-lowered with a phase vocoder-of the whistled stimuli in thesecond experimentto better identify therelative nature of pitchcues employed in this process.Results show thatparticipantsobtainedapproximately50% of correct responses(when chanceis at 25%).These findingsshowspecificconsonant preferencesfor “s” and “t”over“k” and “p”,specifically whenstimuli isunmodified.Previous research on whistled consonantssystemshas often opposed “s” and “t” to “k” and “p”,due to theirstrongpitch modulations. The preference for these two consonantsunderlines theimportanceof these cues in phonemeprocessing.
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titre
Whistled Vowel Identification by French Listeners
auteur
Anaïs Tran Ngoc, Julien Meyer, Fanny Meunier
article
Interspeech 2020 - 21st Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association, Oct 2020, Shanghai (Virtual Conf), China. pp.1605-1609, ⟨10.21437/Interspeech.2020-2697⟩
annee_publi
2020
resume
In this paper, we analyzed whistled vowel categorization by native French listeners. Whistled speech, a natural, yet modified register of speech, is used here as a tool to investigate perceptual processes in languages. We focused on four whistled vowels: /i, e, a, o/. After a detailed description of the vowels, we built and ran a behavioral experiment in which we asked native French speakers to categorize whistled vowel stimuli in which we introduced intra- and inter- production variations. In addition, half of the participants performed the experiment in person (at the laboratory) while the other half participated online, allowing us to evaluate the impact of the testing set up. Our results confirm that the categorization rate of whistled vowels is above chance. They reveal significant differences in performance for different vowels and suggest an influence of certain acoustic parameters from the whistlers’ vowel range on categorization. Moreover, no effect or interaction was found for testing location and circumstances in our data set. This study confirms that whistled stimuli are a useful tool for studying how listeners process modified speech and which parameters impact sound categorization.
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Communication dans un congrès
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